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Mikesid

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Top Perennial Greens
« on: June 24, 2013, 01:21:41 PM »
I'm tired of trying to grow lettuce in this heat and want to replace with some edible perennial greens.. What are your favorites?
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nullzero

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 09:38:08 PM »
I like Silene inflata a lot. Its a tasty perennial green, stands up to the heat with no problem. Also buckhorn plantain (Plantago lanceolata) is very tasty and adaptable to the heat. Both reseed, so I do not know if it will spread. Its very tasty and good to eat in a salad.

mangomike9

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2013, 03:14:53 AM »
You might try Lactuca indica before you give up on lettuce entirely. It is a tropical species that tolerates the heat quite well. It is also perennial, rooting along the stems to form new heads. I think ECHO used to carry it.

Failing that, you might try katuk (Sauropus androgynous) very tasty and nutritious; chaya (Cnidoscolus chayamansa) the leaves are cooked like spinach; another I have heard good things about but have not tried myself is mushroom plant (Rungia klossii)

Mike

TriangleJohn

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2013, 04:48:10 PM »
I grow that Water Spinach sweet potato (Ipomea aquatica) that is banned in many tropical states because it is invasive. I believe you can still grow it for personal use though. The leaves and hollow stems have no flavor at all, with all the crunch of iceberg lettuce. Easy to root. Doesn't have to be in water all the time. Makes a decent houseplant during the winter. Rampant grower during the hottest part of summer. I bought mine at the local Asian market for something like $2 for large clump. I figured if I couldn't keep it alive I could just buy it from them every other week but so far it is growing just fine.

BMc

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2013, 07:09:48 AM »
Kangkong is my bulletproof green. Needs to be restricted. I have a 1m square planter and get heaps from that through the year. Great stir fried with garlic and soy!

Mike T

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2013, 07:17:01 AM »
Kangkung is good stuff alright as well as a few other aquatic plants like aquatic sensitive mimosa and rice paddy herb.I also have ivy gourd vine,green and purple Okinawa spinach,malabar spinach,brazil lettuce/spinach, pepperomia and various herbs.
The world needs more rooting.

jcaldeira

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 03:25:19 PM »
One of my favorites is Hibiscus spinach, which is known as Island Cabbage or Bele in Fiji.  We eat the leaves but the flowers are also edible.  Very nutritious, but can become gummy when cooked wet, similar to okra gumminess.  Grows easily from cuttings.

http://books.google.com.fj/books?id=-w7xn9r68cQC&pg=PA35&lpg=PA35&dq=Fiji+Bele&source=bl&ots=pDSaNzNWv_&sig=BpUXhM8b6GaX1BYR0YGdwkezU8w&hl=en&sa=X&ei=n47MUc2UAqT2iwLzt4DoCw&ved=0CHYQ6AEwDQ#v=onepage&q=Fiji%20Bele&f=false

http://www.floralencounters.com/Seeds/seed_detail.jsp?productid=92988

Also, chives are great perennial green to have around.  It's good with everything from eggs to chicken or a garden salad.

I also grow moringa, but it's labor-intensive to harvest.

Mikesid

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2013, 06:17:48 AM »
Kangkong is my bulletproof green. Needs to be restricted. I have a 1m square planter and get heaps from that through the year. Great stir fried with garlic and soy!

Does it have any special requirements with moisture? Sounds pretty interesting...
Always be planting!

Mikesid

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2013, 06:19:50 AM »
One of my favorites is Hibiscus spinach, which is known as Island Cabbage or Bele in Fiji.  We eat the leaves but the flowers are also edible.  Very nutritious, but can become gummy when cooked wet, similar to okra gumminess.  Grows easily from cuttings.

http://books.google.com.fj/books?id=-w7xn9r68cQC&pg=PA35&lpg=PA35&dq=Fiji+Bele&source=bl&ots=pDSaNzNWv_&sig=BpUXhM8b6GaX1BYR0YGdwkezU8w&hl=en&sa=X&ei=n47MUc2UAqT2iwLzt4DoCw&ved=0CHYQ6AEwDQ#v=onepage&q=Fiji%20Bele&f=false

http://www.floralencounters.com/Seeds/seed_detail.jsp?productid=92988

Also, chives are great perennial green to have around.  It's good with everything from eggs to chicken or a garden salad.

I also grow moringa, but it's labor-intensive to harvest.


The hibiscus is definitely the type of green I'm looking for, ornamental and edible...makes my wife happy when she thinks I'm planting flowers and not just food...
Always be planting!

BMc

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2013, 01:15:32 AM »
Kangkong is my bulletproof green. Needs to be restricted. I have a 1m square planter and get heaps from that through the year. Great stir fried with garlic and soy!

Does it have any special requirements with moisture? Sounds pretty interesting...

Likes moisture, and grows well in a bucket of water. I have mine in a colourbond raised bed with usual vege bed soil plus a bit of my clay loam mixed in - it grows very well if it gets decent sun/heat. Slows somewhat in winter, but in summer it is rampant and you need to chop off the trailing runners so it puts its energy into upright (larger) leaf development. The leaves on the runners are skinny.

Also, I grow a lot of Native Spinach (NZ Spinach, Warrigal greens - tetragonia tetragonioides). Well, it grows itself throughout my garden. Its a great dense groundcover that I grown under my trees. I always have lots of leaf availabe from this one. I also pull it up and dump it back in situ under my trees as a natural mulch when it starts to get too rampant - the soft leaves break down quickly and the next season shoots are up in a few weeks.

I also have purple Okinawa spinach and Piper sarmentosum as border plants and groundcovers in different areas.

RodneyS

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2013, 01:40:13 PM »
Chaya


Katuk


Moringa


Tree collard


Longevity spinach


A friend's Toona sinensis

Hollywood

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2013, 06:41:13 PM »
I read about tree collards and kale in Toensmeier's perennial vegetable book, but I've never seen any for sale in Florida, not even at ECHO. Does anyone in South Florida grow these?
Katie

TropicBob

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2013, 11:27:37 AM »
I am now growing 1 plant of Quailgrass/ Lagos spinach (SoFl). It is very attractive and tastes like swiss chard. I will be growing more. I also like cranberry hibiscus, katuk, chaya, and okinawa spinach a lot.

I believe water spinach and kang kong are the same. There may be two types- a wet type (grows in water) and a dry type (can grow in moist soil). If anyone has this in so fl please let me know.

RodneyS

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2013, 04:30:31 PM »
Hollywood, pm me

Veggie

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Re: Top Perennial Greens
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2013, 11:42:55 AM »
Aztec spinach (actually closer to quinoa). I have found can survive our cold fifteen degree winters well, and tastes wonderful! I am thinking about adding it to this years' winter garden. Dinosaur kale is another good one. The plant is big, and can grow to a few feet, with beautiful blue-green leaves and a better flavor than most kale I have tasted.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2014, 09:54:17 AM by Veggie »

 

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