Tropical Vegetable Forum



Author Topic: A weed for tomato grafting?  (Read 13144 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jcaldeira

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Outdoorplace.org
A weed for tomato grafting?
« on: June 25, 2013, 05:00:13 PM »
There is a common weed here in Fiji that appears to be closely related to eggplant.  It grows up to two meters (6 feet) high and lives several years.  On a whim, I grafted tomato to a few and they're growing well now.  What is the name of this weed?



Here's one of the tomato grafts:



I'm grafting because this weed endures the soggy ground during the rainy season much better than tomato.  It also lives several years so potentially would extend the tomato's productive period.

I'm a little cautious because it also would be related to horsenettle, which is poisonous.  Is there any risk or poision entering the tomatoes?

Thanks, John

Hollywood

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 41
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2013, 09:11:59 PM »
I don't have an answer to your question, but this reminds me of the eggplant tree at Fruit and Spice Park. Does anyone know what they grafted the eggplant onto?
Katie

plantlover13

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2013, 10:00:06 AM »
Well,it's definitely some sort of Solanum.

Have you observed the fruits of the plant? It could help in IDing it.

Also, all solanum are poisonous. Even tomato leaves will make you sick. Potatoes can be especially dangerous.

I highly doubt that any toxins would transfer to the fruit. After all, the top is still a tomato plant, no genetic changes occur.

Maybe you could ask other people in the locality? They might know better than anyone here.

murahilin

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2013, 10:38:22 PM »
I don't have an answer to your question, but this reminds me of the eggplant tree at Fruit and Spice Park. Does anyone know what they grafted the eggplant onto?

It may be the same rootstock used for the "eggplant tree" that I bought from Frankies a few years ago. They said their eggplant tree lasted at least 6 years. Mine died after a few weeks because it never fully recovered from the bare rooting. I would like to try it again and buy another one eventually.

If I remember correctly, they used the potato vine as a rootstock but I am not sure what species of Solanum that is because there are at least two different species that is referred to as potato vine.

Mikesid

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 28
  • Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2013, 06:10:47 AM »
Do you usually graft your tomato plants? There is a native Florida tomato called 'Everglades' that is supposed to be excellent for our sand, nematode infested soils and grows year round...a true perrenial tomato...I wonder if grafting on that would improve other varieties I've tried growing...I usually get a blight and then I just watch them all slowly die...
Always be planting!

plantlover13

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2013, 09:08:59 AM »
quick question, what is an "eggplant tree?"  ???

Is there nowhere local that you can get it identified,or at least come up with a local name?

murahilin

  • Administrator
  • Newbie
  • *****
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2013, 09:31:56 AM »
quick question, what is an "eggplant tree?"  ???

Is there nowhere local that you can get it identified,or at least come up with a local name?

It's a regular eggplant grafted onto a hardier rootstock. The one I bought was a standard long Asian eggplant that was grafted onto a different rootstock to make it survive for a few years and produce all year. The reason they call it a "tree", is based on it's longevity.

jcaldeira

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Outdoorplace.org
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2013, 06:44:57 PM »
Well,it's definitely some sort of Solanum.

Have you observed the fruits of the plant? It could help in IDing it.

Also, all solanum are poisonous. Even tomato leaves will make you sick. Potatoes can be especially dangerous.

I highly doubt that any toxins would transfer to the fruit. After all, the top is still a tomato plant, no genetic changes occur.

Maybe you could ask other people in the locality? They might know better than anyone here.


The photo below shows the species of weed I am using to graft tomatoes on an experimental basis.  It is flowering and has one round green fruit (photo on right).  This shrub is approximately 1.5 meters (5 foot) high.  It does very well in droughts.

   

I haven't found anybody who uses this weed for anything.  Citrus flavor is known to be influenced by the choice of  rootstock; thus my concern about poisonous sap making it's way into my tomatoes.

By the way, the most popular variety of eggplant here has a productive life of more than 3 years.  Here's one of mine:



plantlover13

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2013, 12:32:00 PM »
Well,it's definitely some sort of Solanum.

Have you observed the fruits of the plant? It could help in IDing it.

Also, all solanum are poisonous. Even tomato leaves will make you sick. Potatoes can be especially dangerous.

I highly doubt that any toxins would transfer to the fruit. After all, the top is still a tomato plant, no genetic changes occur.

Maybe you could ask other people in the locality? They might know better than anyone here.


The photo below shows the species of weed I am using to graft tomatoes on an experimental basis.  It is flowering and has one round green fruit (photo on right).  This shrub is approximately 1.5 meters (5 foot) high.  It does very well in droughts.

   

I haven't found anybody who uses this weed for anything.  Citrus flavor is known to be influenced by the choice of  rootstock; thus my concern about poisonous sap making it's way into my tomatoes.

By the way, the most popular variety of eggplant here has a productive life of more than 3 years.  Here's one of mine:





Amazing eggplant! what is it called?

Sorry if i sound like a stuck recorder, but what do the locals call the weed? or any universities in the area?

jcaldeira

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Outdoorplace.org
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2013, 04:32:21 PM »
Amazing eggplant! what is it called?

Sorry if i sound like a stuck recorder, but what do the locals call the weed? or any universities in the area?

The eggplant variety is referred to as "Long Purple" or "Fiji Long".   It might also be known as "Pritam", but I'm not sure; on a Department of Agriculture list of recommended varieties, one bullet point read "Pritam/Long Purple".  This variety of fruit is exported in small quantities to New Zealand.  It is the most popular variety in Fiji.

The weed in Hindi is locally called 'Baigania', which is similar to the Hindi word for eggplant, 'Baigan'.  It does not give any allergic reaction to the touch or from the sap. 

No universities convenient to me. 

There is a good chance it is an relatively recently introduced weed since it is most commonly found in animal pastures and roadsides, and rarely in the bush.

jcaldeira

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Outdoorplace.org
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2013, 02:08:36 AM »
I don't have an answer to your question, but this reminds me of the eggplant tree at Fruit and Spice Park. Does anyone know what they grafted the eggplant onto?

It might be this weed they call the Devil Plant, which is similar (or the same) as mine:

http://deepgreenpermaculture.com/diy-instructions/grafting-eggplant-onto-devil-plant/

I would do the grafts much lower on the stem that what is shown on the above webpage, but maybe they want a 'tree' look.

plantlover13

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2013, 10:58:44 AM »
I just realized what that plant looked like! it looks like a plant that in southern India (Tamil Nadu) is called sundaica, edible. It has white flowers in clusters and produces bunches of small, green fruit, ripen to yellow, dry to black, and are eaten green. It has fuzzy leaves that can cause irritation if you keep touching it, but you won't get an allergic reaction. and lives for a long time and can grow into a large bush. I have lots of seeds of this plant and am planning to grow them this year. I will post pictures as the season progresses so we can compare. I might try grafting on them too.

I think it is probably this plant, as you mentioned a name in Hindi for this plant, and this is very common in India. It got me thinking of eggplant-like solanum i've seen on my trips there, and I remembered this. See, local names are important! Even if i'm totally wrong, :-[ , we still have a lead!  ;D

Here are pictures of the dried, ripe seeds and fruits (sorry for poor quality):



EDIT:

FOUND IT!!!

Scientific name: Solanum Torvum.

Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_torvum

Note that it is sometimes called pea eggplant, hence the hindi name.

Google image search:
https://www.google.com/search?q=Solanum+torvum&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=oVXUUcCLHpK30AG24IC4Bg&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1241&bih=584

In the comments on the grafting article you posted earlier (http://deepgreenpermaculture.com/diy-instructions/grafting-eggplant-onto-devil-plant/), this plant was mentioned as a rootstock for eggplant.

So glad I now know the scientific name for (as wikipedia spells it) sundaikkai!

All the google pics look like your plant., and my personal experience with S. torvum also suggests this.

I am now 100 percent willing to bet that the plant you have is S. Torvum, what i know as sundaikkai.

Also, because the fruits of S. Torvum are edible, I believe that the fruits of your graft will definitely be safe to eat.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 01:09:58 PM by plantlover13 »

jcaldeira

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Outdoorplace.org
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2013, 01:50:11 AM »
That looks like my weed, indeed.  Thanks for the ID.  No one that I've asked knows anything about whether it is edible, though.

Today I went out and saw some specimens with clusters of the little green fruit.  None are ripe yet.  The plant is quite variable in form depending on how much shade and competition it receives from other plants.

I'll post an update on my tomato grafts in a couple of months.

John 

plantlover13

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2013, 10:39:33 AM »
That looks like my weed, indeed.  Thanks for the ID.  No one that I've asked knows anything about whether it is edible, though.

Today I went out and saw some specimens with clusters of the little green fruit.  None are ripe yet.  The plant is quite variable in form depending on how much shade and competition it receives from other plants.

I'll post an update on my tomato grafts in a couple of months.

John

If we can completely make certain that is is Sundakkai, then it is edible for sure. I will also post pictures of my plants in a couple months so we can compare.

Guanabanus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: A weed for tomato grafting?
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2013, 11:09:50 PM »
In Brazil, tomatoes are sometimes grafted onto "Jurubeba", which look like these pictures.  Many of these wild Solanum species are classified as invasive exotics--- importation forbidden.  But if you already have them growing locally, definitely graft onto them.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2013, 12:20:38 PM by Guanabanus »

 

Copyright © Tropical Vegetable Forum