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Luisport

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Jerusalem artichoke
« on: September 03, 2013, 06:38:51 AM »

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 09:06:02 AM »

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 10:44:14 AM »
Why are they good for me?

Eat Jerusalem artichokes and you'll be topping up on important minerals. They are rich in iron to give you energy, along with potassium and vitamin B1, which support your muscles and nerves. Although they're sweet, their starchy fibre stops any spikes in blood sugar levels indeed they have a lower glycemic index (GI) score than potatoes and they aren't fattening.
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/feb/02/jerusalem-artichokes-good-for-you

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 10:59:06 AM »

Veggie

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 11:09:52 AM »
Are you growing this? Depending on import/export rules, I could send you seeds. Just know these plants get huge, and can live for years! Two plants nearby are five years old and eight feet tall, but thankfully very productive.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 11:37:00 AM by Veggie »

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2013, 02:15:24 PM »
Are you growing this? Depending on import/export rules, I could send you seeds. Just know these plants get huge, and can live for years! Two plants nearby are five years old and eight feet tall, but thankfully very productive.
Thank you my friend, i will get it here. But by the way, how you take the potatoes without kill the plant?

Veggie

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2013, 02:19:28 PM »
Are you growing this? Depending on import/export rules, I could send you seeds. Just know these plants get huge, and can live for years! Two plants nearby are five years old and eight feet tall, but thankfully very productive.
Thank you my friend, i will get it here. But by the way, how you take the potatoes without kill the plant?

I am not sure. The root is the main root, so I don't think it is possible, but perhaps if you grew it as an annual, you could harvest a few each year, and keep one plant for seeds.

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2013, 02:55:14 PM »
Are you growing this? Depending on import/export rules, I could send you seeds. Just know these plants get huge, and can live for years! Two plants nearby are five years old and eight feet tall, but thankfully very productive.
Thank you my friend, i will get it here. But by the way, how you take the potatoes without kill the plant?

I am not sure. The root is the main root, so I don't think it is possible, but perhaps if you grew it as an annual, you could harvest a few each year, and keep one plant for seeds.
ok i see... Thank you for your tips!  ;D

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2013, 09:18:10 AM »
i just plant my first ones!

TriangleJohn

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2013, 02:19:53 PM »
Unless you grow them in a container you will never harvest all the tubers. You'll get tons of tubers but some of the tiny ones will get left behind and those are the ones that will start next years crop. Once you plant this guy in the garden you will have it always. They are very hard to get rid of so plant it where you want it.

These are one of the tastiest root vegetables that I know of. They go with anything and you can fix them any way you want, they're even good raw. They taste like a nutty potato. They can give you gas and I mean really bad gas. Plenty of people nick name them 'fartichokes' because of it. If you cook them and blend them with other root crops the gas problem doesn't seem to happen.

The best thing about them for my zone 7 garden is that you don't have to harvest them at any certain time. You can just leave them in the ground and dig up the amount you need at any given time. The tuber shrink during the summer so most folks eat them in the winter. They taste better after we've had a hard frost.

If they get too big (tall) you can cut them back half way through the summer and feed the leaves and stems to chickens or goats or anything. It doesn't seem to hurt the plant at all.

Veggie

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2013, 02:53:23 PM »
Unless you grow them in a container you will never harvest all the tubers. You'll get tons of tubers but some of the tiny ones will get left behind and those are the ones that will start next years crop. Once you plant this guy in the garden you will have it always. They are very hard to get rid of so plant it where you want it.

These are one of the tastiest root vegetables that I know of. They go with anything and you can fix them any way you want, they're even good raw. They taste like a nutty potato. They can give you gas and I mean really bad gas. Plenty of people nick name them 'fartichokes' because of it. If you cook them and blend them with other root crops the gas problem doesn't seem to happen.

The best thing about them for my zone 7 garden is that you don't have to harvest them at any certain time. You can just leave them in the ground and dig up the amount you need at any given time. The tuber shrink during the summer so most folks eat them in the winter. They taste better after we've had a hard frost.

If they get too big (tall) you can cut them back half way through the summer and feed the leaves and stems to chickens or goats or anything. It doesn't seem to hurt the plant at all.

Oh, so they are an actual root crop, growing tubers, and not just a swollen tap root like normal artichokes. I wondered what use the leaves might have. They are so large, it seems a shame to waste them. Can you use the buds like a normal artichoke, and if so, what is the difference (flavor)? I will post a picture of the mature plant later, Luis.

plantlover13

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2013, 08:37:06 PM »
Unless you grow them in a container you will never harvest all the tubers. You'll get tons of tubers but some of the tiny ones will get left behind and those are the ones that will start next years crop. Once you plant this guy in the garden you will have it always. They are very hard to get rid of so plant it where you want it.

These are one of the tastiest root vegetables that I know of. They go with anything and you can fix them any way you want, they're even good raw. They taste like a nutty potato. They can give you gas and I mean really bad gas. Plenty of people nick name them 'fartichokes' because of it. If you cook them and blend them with other root crops the gas problem doesn't seem to happen.

The best thing about them for my zone 7 garden is that you don't have to harvest them at any certain time. You can just leave them in the ground and dig up the amount you need at any given time. The tuber shrink during the summer so most folks eat them in the winter. They taste better after we've had a hard frost.

If they get too big (tall) you can cut them back half way through the summer and feed the leaves and stems to chickens or goats or anything. It doesn't seem to hurt the plant at all.

Oh, so they are an actual root crop, growing tubers, and not just a swollen tap root like normal artichokes. I wondered what use the leaves might have. They are so large, it seems a shame to waste them. Can you use the buds like a normal artichoke, and if so, what is the difference (flavor)? I will post a picture of the mature plant later, Luis.

They are not artichokes. they are also not from jerusalem. They are actually in the aster/sunflower family. Totally unrelated. Also, that family happens to be massive, the second largest flowering plant family i believe. So what the other parts are good for, no clue. Have fun looking it up.

Also, they are supposed to cause massive amounts of painful gas. Beware.


Veggie

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2013, 01:05:46 AM »
Unless you grow them in a container you will never harvest all the tubers. You'll get tons of tubers but some of the tiny ones will get left behind and those are the ones that will start next years crop. Once you plant this guy in the garden you will have it always. They are very hard to get rid of so plant it where you want it.

These are one of the tastiest root vegetables that I know of. They go with anything and you can fix them any way you want, they're even good raw. They taste like a nutty potato. They can give you gas and I mean really bad gas. Plenty of people nick name them 'fartichokes' because of it. If you cook them and blend them with other root crops the gas problem doesn't seem to happen.

The best thing about them for my zone 7 garden is that you don't have to harvest them at any certain time. You can just leave them in the ground and dig up the amount you need at any given time. The tuber shrink during the summer so most folks eat them in the winter. They taste better after we've had a hard frost.

If they get too big (tall) you can cut them back half way through the summer and feed the leaves and stems to chickens or goats or anything. It doesn't seem to hurt the plant at all.

Oh, so they are an actual root crop, growing tubers, and not just a swollen tap root like normal artichokes. I wondered what use the leaves might have. They are so large, it seems a shame to waste them. Can you use the buds like a normal artichoke, and if so, what is the difference (flavor)? I will post a picture of the mature plant later, Luis.

They are not artichokes. they are also not from jerusalem. They are actually in the aster/sunflower family. Totally unrelated. Also, that family happens to be massive, the second largest flowering plant family i believe. So what the other parts are good for, no clue. Have fun looking it up.

Also, they are supposed to cause massive amounts of painful gas. Beware.

They are not artichokes, and are more closely related to sunflowers than artichokes, but are in fact related and in the same family, just in different, related tribes (there are many in asteracae). A key to identifying asteracae is the compound flowers: each petal belongs to a single flower, and are arranged as to look like a much larger flower. Yes, John already stated they give you gas.

TriangleJohn

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2013, 09:55:46 AM »
I don't know of any humans eating any other part of the plant except the tubers. The leaves are pretty bristle-y so you would have to cook them if you want to try it. Any plant eating livestock will eat the stems and leaves, sometimes chickens will wait and let them wilt and soften before they gobble them up but sometimes they just chow down the minute you throw some at them.

I've heard the pigs love to dig up the tubers. Which may be a way to remove them from an area.

Luisport

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Re: Jerusalem artichoke
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2013, 04:40:36 PM »
I don't know of any humans eating any other part of the plant except the tubers. The leaves are pretty bristle-y so you would have to cook them if you want to try it. Any plant eating livestock will eat the stems and leaves, sometimes chickens will wait and let them wilt and soften before they gobble them up but sometimes they just chow down the minute you throw some at them.

I've heard the pigs love to dig up the tubers. Which may be a way to remove them from an area.
Yes i only see the use for tubers, not leaves... but we never know! ;)

 

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